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nonspin

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nonspin last won the day on August 7 2014

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About nonspin

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    http://www.leetsome.com

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    Windows 7 x64

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  1. Microsoft .NET Framework 4.7 for Windows 7

    I'll make it short: DO NOT TOUCH THIS ADDON. Why? For example, have look into "NDP461-KB3154529-x86-x64.reg" This is just one sloppy piece which is capable of cross-contermining systems. The .reg contains ABSOLUTE PATHs, "C:\windows\". Now what will happen if you setup windows on D: -- next to your current one ?. How long will it take to screw up BOTH systems, because trying to clean the setup on D:\ also screws with c:\ Now what are the odds, since the author couldn't be bothered to use %windir%, that everything else is as sloppy ? I'll advice everyone to setup chocolatey at at startup batching everything crucial - like "choco inst powershell" would deal with everything: removing wMF4, insfalling WMF5, DOTNET4.5 and Powershell 5..
  2. Weblinks infected

    Using the "Downloads" from inside of your WinToolkit application to access - let's say ISO's, -> in an unregistered state -> ad.fly redirection is enabled. Once you have registered your copy of WinToolkit - those ad.fly redirects go away. However, ad.fly is just a 5 second advertising placeholder (watch the countdown at the top-right of your page). Once it hits "0" - you can proceed to the initial target. This is common practice and has nothing to do with malware or infected code.
  3. SecureBoot and all the CSM functionality doesn't have any effect on Win 7. Also UEFI-Boot doesn't work on any other than FAT32. UEFI doesn't do anything to your Boot-functionality (other than forcing it into FAT32) and it does not magically turn your USB into a magic carpet. Therefore - rethink your approach and opt for compatibility
  4. http://www.wincert.net/tips has no index or 301 redirect set - therefore ends in 404 Everything below is fine: http://www.wincert.net/tips/microsoft-windows
  5. The original format is <Highpart> & <Lowpart> From there - w32time - will convert it to whatever Location/Region is set. Each Location/Region has a defaul Format according to the Language. for example: Location: UK Default Format: English (United Kingdom) Short Date: dd/MM/yyyy Location: JP Default Format: Japanese (Japan) Short Date: yyyy/MM/dd
  6. Removing language packs

    How much of a difference (MB) is there ?
  7. Problem with starting WinToolkit

    When closing WTK via TaskManager, sometimes temp-files get stuck in a corrupt state. After executing WTK, it looks for previous configs .. also trying to process the corrupt one(s) - which it doesn't like and commits suicide
  8. That's why i use a service to handle 3rd-party/custom themes - rather than patching the files. ;D
  9. You could skip all the tasks converting times. Simply copy whatever is inside <LASTMODIFICATIONTIME> and replace it with whatever is inside <CREATIONTIME> for example: copy the part in red to notedpad <LASTMODIFICATIONTIME> <HIGHPART>0x01CF83B1</HIGHPART><LOWPART>0xE5F87098</LOWPART> </LASTMODIFICATIONTIME> paste it to: <CREATIONTIME> <HIGHPART>0x01CF83B1</HIGHPART><LOWPART>0xE5F87098</LOWPART> </CREATIONTIME> This would also reflect the REAL time it was modified and not the value you have generated
  10. WIMGAPI.DLL

    Had a look into wimlib ? I think it's an alternative worth considering. http://sourceforge.net/projects/wimlib/
  11. you mean Date/Time to Integer8? (remove .txt from attached file) Usage (from CMD) cscript DateToInteger8.vbs "06/09/2014 10:30:00 PM" result: Integer8 value: 130468194000000000 (decimal output) -> use calc.exe (programmer mode) to convert to hex (QWORD) -> 1CF842195DB5400 highpart:01CF8421 lowpart:95DB5400 validation: w32tm /ntte 0x1CF842195DB5400 151004 20:30:00.0000000 - 6/9/2014 10:30:00 PM DateToInteger8.vbs.txt
  12. w32tm /ntte 0x1CF83BD00A67400 151004 08:30:00.0000000 - 6/9/2014 10:30:00 AM 151004 08:30:00. <- GMT ... 6/9/2014 10:30:00 AM <- relative to GMT (system setting > GMT+2)
  13. Highpart/Lowpart explanation: Highpart: Date Lowpart: Time convert/verify: w32tm example: <CREATIONTIME><HIGHPART>0x01CB88D1</HIGHPART><LOWPART>0xDB7CCA61</LOWPART></CREATIONTIME>syntax: w32tm /ntte 0xHIGHPARTLOWPART Open DOS-Box: (Win+R) CMD w32tm /ntte 0x01CB88D1DB7CCA61 149707 16:42:02.2122081 - 11/20/2010 6:42:02 PM
  14. ahh, now it makes sense here. Thing is, that i never had issues with the displayed date, because i always apply a custom boot layer to get my USB3 to work properly. Therefore it never showed the wrong date in the setup.
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