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Is there a way to reduce the image size after integrating?


jvidal
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Hi, Guys!

 

As you probably know, after integrating a ton of updates into a win7 or win81 image, the size grows A LOT (resulting isos are about 7 GB for the x64 versions).

 

When you install updates in windows you can run the cleanmanager afterwards to delete old updates and free up A LOT of disk space.

Is there a way to do that on an image that has been processed by wintoolkit?

 

Any help would be very much appreciated!

 

thanks!

 

 

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I integrate updates for all the images (starter, home basic, etc, etc).

 

The resulting isos are:

 

win7 x86: 3,90GB (original is about 2,3GB)

Win7 x64: 5,70 GB (original is about 3 GB)

 

Win81 Single Lang x64: 5,95GB (original is about 3 GB)

Win 81 x86: 4,5 GB (original about 2,5GB)

Win81 x64: 6,8 GB (original about 3,2 GB).

 

After installing win81, I run the cleanmanger and it frees up up to 11 GB.

 

This is exactly like installing updates on a running system,.Besides updating the files, windows keeps copies in the WinSXS folder. That space can be freed using cleanmgr. I want to know if it is possible to free that same space from the WinSXS folder in the  image after integrating.

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Take a look at these images. The first is the original, untouched install.wim. The second is after integrating updates with wintoolkit.

I have all obsolete updates removed. I took the time to check ALL of them in the windows update catalog and keep only the current ones. I even started from scratch, using the original image as source.

 

Look at how every image is about 6GB bigger on the updated image. That's the space I want to recover.

 

 

post-78085-0-54067600-1448300710_thumb.p

post-78085-0-51494700-1448300719_thumb.p

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thx, I'll check it!

BTW, the iso is not a problem, you can just decompress it and work on the decompressed folder.

 

I just want to do exactly what the clean manager does on a running installation, but on the source!

Edited by jvidal
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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm in the same situation as @jvidal . My AIO is around 8 gigs, with all updates intergrated since November. What should I do, to reduce the size? You said there is a way to remove superseeded updates. How to do this? I tried Dism ++, and mounted the install.wim of my x64 setup.. Only 400MB to remove.. what is going on?

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@Stavros,

I knew that Dism++ saved more space when working on an installed system, I thought it would save more. I only tested this program in an installed system (> 3 years).

Saved space in an ISO using this program depends of number of updates you integrate : if you use only updates required to satisfy WU (my minimal update list for example) you won't save any space because all unneeded updates are already removed.

In my last integration, an updated Wim for only one edition takes 4.6 Go in x64 and 3.3 in x86, you have to multipliate with all editions and you will obtain your 8 GB... There is no way, it would have been more simple with a SP2 for Windows 7...

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In my last integration, an updated Wim for only one edition takes 4.6 Go in x64 and 3.3 in x86, you have to multipliate with all editions and you will obtain your 8 GB...

 

No, as you know wim files are compressed, you can update all different editions (for a specified CPU architecture) in one wim and the size will be almost the same, because nearly all the files are the same.*

 

If you mix X86 and X64 it will be bigger because a lot of files are different, but it will still be smaller than one x86 wim + one x64 wim.

 

(* See also this old request, sadly still unfulfilled)

 

 

after integrating a ton of updates into a win7 or win81 image

 

@Stavros: why would you want to integrate a ton of updates in the first place ? Follow rhahgleuhargh's advice and use his list ! (or continue to integrate a ton of update and accept the fact that the ISO will be bloated).

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@Stavros,

I knew that Dism++ saved more space when working on an installed system, I thought it would save more. I only tested this program in an installed system (> 3 years).

Saved space in an ISO using this program depends of number of updates you integrate : if you use only updates required to satisfy WU (my minimal update list for example) you won't save any space because all unneeded updates are already removed.

In my last integration, an updated Wim for only one edition takes 4.6 Go in x64 and 3.3 in x86, you have to multipliate with all editions and you will obtain your 8 GB... There is no way, it would have been more simple with a SP2 for Windows 7...

 

 

 

In my last integration, an updated Wim for only one edition takes 4.6 Go in x64 and 3.3 in x86, you have to multipliate with all editions and you will obtain your 8 GB...

 

No, as you know wim files are compressed, you can update all different editions (for a specified CPU architecture) in one wim and the size will be almost the same, because nearly all the files are the same.*

 

If you mix X86 and X64 it will be bigger because a lot of files are different, but it will still be smaller than one x86 wim + one x64 wim.

 

(* See also this old request, sadly still unfulfilled)

 

 

after integrating a ton of updates into a win7 or win81 image

 

@Stavros: why would you want to integrate a ton of updates in the first place ? Follow rhahgleuhargh's advice and use his list ! (or continue to integrate a ton of update and accept the fact that the ISO will be bloated).

 

 

 

The point of updating a system, is basically for security purpose. I know, it is Windows, they will never be safe, but, why just intergrate updates that only make the WU think it is ok? Also it is a lot faster formating a machine in the same time or even 10 minutes slower, than waiting to download updates after a format. Specially when there is no good connection in my country.. 

I made this question because I want to make a multiboot usb stick with all versions of windows, and fully updated. But as i can see now.. Maybe I will make one usb for each OS of Microsoft.. Nevermind.. Thank you for your fast and accurate answers! Cya around!

Edited by Stavros P.
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In my last integration, an updated Wim for only one edition takes 4.6 Go in x64 and 3.3 in x86, you have to multipliate with all editions and you will obtain your 8 GB...

 

No, as you know wim files are compressed, you can update all different editions (for a specified CPU architecture) in one wim and the size will be almost the same, because nearly all the files are the same.*

 

If you mix X86 and X64 it will be bigger because a lot of files are different, but it will still be smaller than one x86 wim + one x64 wim.

 

(* See also this old request, sadly still unfulfilled)

@mooms,

Good to know, but some updates are useless depending the chosen edition, but indeed it could save a lot of time ! Do you have the command script (it's not available in the link of the post, you can only access to the forum if you have an account) ? thanks in advance.

Edited by rhahgleuhargh
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@mooms,

Good to know, but some updates are useless depending the chosen edition, ...

Even so,

 

No, every version of Windows has all the necessary the files in the winsxs folder, this is why you can integrate ALL updates into any sku, the files are waiting there for you in case you ever upgrade your edition with anytime upgrade

Use /Get-TargetEditions on a mounted image and it will let you know what versions it can be upgraded to, here is starter:

 

Editions that can be upgraded to:Target Edition : UltimateTarget Edition : ProfessionalTarget Edition : HomePremiumTarget Edition : HomeBasic

Which command script?

Cheers and Regards

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No, every version of Windows has all the necessary the files in the winsxs folder, this is why you can integrate ALL updates into any sku, the files are waiting there for you in case you ever upgrade your edition with anytime upgrade

Use /Get-TargetEditions on a mounted image and it will let you know what versions it can be upgraded to, here is starter:

 

Editions that can be upgraded to:Target Edition : UltimateTarget Edition : ProfessionalTarget Edition : HomePremiumTarget Edition : HomeBasic

Which command script?

Cheers and Regards

 

Hi,

I would like to know how integrate updates to all Editions with Wintoolkit, or if there was a script to make it automatically. I'm not familiar with DISM usage.

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Well, I finally had the time to try Dism++ and I must say THANKS A LOT!!!! This tool works miracles!!!

I was able to reduce mi image from 19,5GB down to 12,7 and install.wim from 5,5GB to 3,2GB (Win81 SL x64).

This is EXACTLY what I was looking for. Thanks!!!!!

IT took me a while to get familiarized with the tool due to very poor translation, but after I learned to use it properly, it worked great!!!!

 

PD: When I said I removed all obsolete updates, I meant I removed all *.msu files that were superseeded (by checking one-by-one on windows update catalog). Is there a way to remove superseeded updates that have already been integrated, using wintoolkit? if so, how?

 

Edit: unfortunately, dism++ didn't work on win7 x64. Once I mounted the wim and scaned it for freeable space i got an error saying that it can't process it, 'cause i need to reboot to install some pending updates. Of, course, I cant "reboot" a wim file,since it's not a running system. So I guess I'm screwed...

Edited by jvidal
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Is there a way to remove superseeded updates that have already been integrated, using wintoolkit? if so, how?

 

When You done that (checking one-by-one on windows update catalog) once it´s only to keep up with the monthly MS Security Bulletins, See which new updates that are added and remove the superseeded. After that You run Wintoolkit as usual.

 

It´s no fun - but it works!

Edited by sweden8
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That's what I do, I remove the obsolete *.msu files from my disk, but when I run wintoolkit on the updated source, those updates are not removed from the image, they're just removed from the list of updates. Those updates are already integrated.

The only way is to start with an untouched image every time, but that takes WAY TOO MUCH TIME, about 6 hrs, because it has to integrate about 225 updates instead of just the new ones.

it takes about 1,5 hrs for every edition...

Edited by jvidal
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... but when I run wintoolkit on the updated source, those updates are not removed from the image, they're just removed from the list of updates. Those updates are already integrated.

 

To my knowledge, Win Toolkit, nor any other tool, can remove an update that is already integrated.

 

The only way is to start with an untouched image every time, but that takes WAY TOO MUCH TIME, about 6 hrs, because it has to integrate about 225 updates instead of just the new ones.

it takes about 1,5 hrs for every edition...

 

If you want to do all editions, you need to master the "Update target editions" as mooms suggested. ricktendo was the one to discover the method and share it here, and Lego has confirmed that it works. We're all hoping that he will automate the process in Win Toolkit soon.

Cheers and Regards

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You can:

- Use "Update target editions" if you can manage to understand how it works.

- Use a SSD.

- Make an updated image every 3/4 months.

- Let WinToolkit updating in the background when you're not on the PC.

I love how everyone says use a SSD but don't stop to think not everyone can have one. Yes they are relatively cheap but even a sixty dollar one is the same price as my power bill. It's all not feasible for everyone have one.

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You can:

- Use "Update target editions" if you can manage to understand how it works.

- Use a SSD.

- Make an updated image every 3/4 months.

- Let WinToolkit updating in the background when you're not on the PC.

I love how everyone says use a SSD but don't stop to think not everyone can have one. Yes they are relatively cheap but even a sixty dollar one is the same price as my power bill. It's all not feasible for everyone have one.

 

 

I'm aware of that.

This is why I have proposed 4 suggestions, each one can be used with or without any of the others.

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